Author Topic: Dream Dictionary  (Read 4240 times)

Sealchan

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Dream Dictionary
« on: July 05, 2007, 12:56:57 PM »
I find dream dictionaries annoying.  To my mind they tend to ignore the variety of subjective associations while their claim to objectivity is less than connected to anything I have come to understand.

Having just finished reading Pscyhological Types with its famous Chapter XI of definitions, I have, however, re-realized that I love definitions and I love to come up with definitions for words.  In that vein, I will begin to systematically compile a kind of dream dictionary of my own terms, so that I can keep track of the concepts that I have and am developing with respect to an objective analysis of dreams.  Perhaps, I will be able to eventually fulfill a life-long dream of producing a book of these definitions in the form of my own Dream Dictionary.  My hope is that this dream dictionary would actually be more useful than those which I have examined.

When Matt returns I will ask him to create a sub-forum in this section entitled Dream Dictionary.  I will put definitions in there for others to read, critique or otherwise make use of.     

Sealchan

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Re: Dream Dictionary
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2007, 04:31:31 PM »
Thanks, Matt!

I have posted 5 entries for a future dream dictionary.   (-)appl(-)

Sealchan

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Re: Dream Dictionary
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2007, 12:37:13 PM »
I googled "dream dictionary" and started to peruse the sites...yikes!  The definitions in these things read to me somewhere in the spectrum of obvious analogies to outright, subjective, personal associations of no objective value. 

I think the bulk of dream dictionaries are shallow attempts by intuitives to map some kind of abstracted meaning onto dream experiences that they do not fundamentally understand.  There is a deeper structure to the psyche than what most of these web sites appear to comprehend.  Yet, the dream dictionary is probably the first book a casual dream enthusiast might pick up to examine their dreams.  At best there is a creative effort to help the dreamer rethink the metaphoric possibilities of a dream.  However, the shallowness of the treatment of dream motifs seems to me to lack all sense of the mystical and scientific possibilities for discovery.

I sense a ripe opportunity here...to write a book to hook the casual enthusiast and inform the intense dream explorer...